Mar 22, 2018

Meeting Residents’ Expectations in Aged Care Homes

One of the biggest challenges for providers of Aged Care Facilities is meeting the expectations of residents and their families. From my perspective, as an Aged Care Placement Consultant, I perceive that many families expect their loved ones to receive one on one attention 24/7.

Of course, this is unrealistic as sometimes the other residents will need the attention of the staff. This can’t be helped in accommodation where there are a number of residents with varying levels of care needs to be met.

Clients always ask me about staff ratios, which has become a hot topic in aged care. This is a difficult question to answer since the introduction of Ageing In Place, because most Aged Care Homes now have a mixture of high and low needs and staff numbers are rostered according to care needs and work load at any given time.

The most helpful question to ask of an Aged Care Facility is the availability of Registered Nurses on each shift, including overnight, as well as the availability of Doctors on weekends and overnight.

The quality of food is the other big issue in Aged Care Homes and I understand why it’s so important. Apart from the nutritional value, food plays a major role in the daily life of a resident. The anticipation of meals is an important focus and having a good feed leaves them satisfied.

Everyone enters a home anticipating the food will be up to standard and palatable; some are disappointed at the quality, while others find the meals delicious.

Earlier in my career when I worked in Aged Care Facilities I was amused that it was often the people who had lived alone surviving on toast or crumpets who complained the most about the food.

I would hear the complaints the Chef received and they were often contradictory, some thought the soup too hot, some too cold, some found the gravy too thick, some too thin. I realised how difficult it was to deliver meals for such a large and diverse population, also taking into account medical conditions, and still please everyone. I can assure you there are many residents who do enjoy their food.

In my experience, the people who choose to enter Residential Aged Care and embrace their new lifestyle thrive and are mostly content. And, like anything else, those who look for the bad will always find it and will probably never be happy.

This post was originally posted on Oasis Aged Care Solutions website

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  1. Oh come on Jillian, your comments are flippant and show a complete lack of care & respect. A resident is entitled, and should be encouraged, to express their dissatisfaction with the facility. How is a resident’s diet and culinary skills prior to moving in to a care facility relevant to their ability to know if a meal is enjoyable or edible? Aren’t we all food critics when we dine out? Why should a resident’s dining experience be any different to yours when going out to eat? I find you comments unpalatable.

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