Oct 27, 2017

85 Year Old Resident Assaulted By Aged Care Worker

An elderly resident from an Estia Health aged care home, in New South Wales, has allegedly been assaulted by a worker from the facility where she resided.

According to the NSW police, the 58 year old employee entered the elderly woman’s room, in the North Epping facility, and assaulted her on August 22.

Yesterday morning, the aged care worker was arrested Ryde Police Station and charged with four counts of assault occasioning actual bodily harm and five counts of common assault.

However, she was granted conditional bail, and it due to appear at her hearing at Burwood Local Court next week.

Estia have released a statement which confirmed the aged care workers arrest.

“Estia does not tolerate behaviour of the kind that has been alleged under any circumstances and terminated the employment of the staff member,” Estia chief executive Norah Barlow said.

“Our response to the allegation was handled as it should be – quickly, sensitively, and within the legal framework.”

This case adds to a list of aged care assault that has been reported by the media.

Earlier this week HelloCare reported a 70 year old grandmother has allegedly been assaulted by a male nurse at her aged care facility.

And before that, there was a male aged care worker man had been accused of assaulting his teenage colleague when he grabbed her by the throat and threatened that “he could kill her”.  

Government Action

Earlier this week the Minister for Aged Care, Ken Wyatt, spoke about various issues, including elder abuse, at the National Press Club in Canberra.

Elder abuse appears to be all too frequent in aged care, and Minister Wyatt acknowledges that something needs to be done about it.

“Elder abuse is unacceptable, and will only be stamped out when it is confronted and corrected, and the Turnbull Government is now leading a national agenda to address this.”

“We shouldn’t allow any senior Australian to be subjected to some of the events that have happened.”

“I will continue to work with my agency and with all of the aged care providers to make sure that we collectively commit to providing a very safe home for senior Australians.”

“Because I want to be able to go into aged care when I get to that point knowing that I’m going to get care that will look after me until the day I pass away. And that is what I want, but I want quality care in that total mix.”

Minster Wyatt also said that the advocacy groups had been raising this issue with him for some time.

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  1. This is disgraceful they should never be allowed to work in this profession again. And one day they will be old!

    1. I am wondering if those who attacked defenceless residents were qualified nurses (legally protected title) or were aids in nursing – unregulated, not recognized as professionals, unlike nurses. If the latter then this article undermines opinion of dedicated and hard working, in order to upheld high ethical standard in aged care, nurses.

  2. This is a sad reality. Cameras should be placed everywhere. Random checks should be made. Facility Managers should be held more accountable for doing proper checks and taking reports more seriously. I have seen and heard the fear of residents and family members. It is also wrong that anyone can just walk into facilities. I had to report an incident once and thereafter my mother appeared heavily drugged but no one, not even the Dr seemed concerned. I was caught in a situation where I did not know who to turn to and I felt as helpless as my mother. In the end I visited day and night at random times. Our elderly are at a higher risk than our toddlers in daycare.

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